CNN star presenter Anderson Cooper has been a father thanks to a surrogate for hire | People

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Anderson Cooper, 52 and a CNN star presenter, has announced through his social networks that he has been the father of a surrogate for a boy named Wyatt Morgan Cooper, in memory of his father who died when he was 10 years. “It is sweet, soft, healthy and I am more than happy,” said the proud father.

“I hope I can be as good a father as mine was. My son’s middle name is Morgan. It is my mother’s last name. I know my mother and father liked the name because I recently came across a list they made 52 years ago, when they were trying to think of names for me. ”

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I want to share with you some joyful news. On Monday, I became a father. This is Wyatt Cooper. He is three days old. He is named after my father, who died when I was ten. I hope I can be as good a dad as he was. My son’s middle name is Morgan. It’s a family name on my mom’s side. I know my mom and dad liked the name morgan because I recently found a list they made 52 years ago when they were trying to think of names for me. Wyatt Morgan Cooper. My son. He was 7.2 lbs at birth, and he is sweet, and soft, and healthy and I am beyond happy. As a gay kid, I never thought it would be possible to have a child, and I’m grateful for all those who have paved the way, and for the doctors and nurses and everyone involved in my son’s birth. Most of all, I am grateful to a remarkable surrogate who carried Wyatt, and watched over him lovingly, and tenderly, and gave birth to him. It is an extraordinary blessing – what she, and all surrogates give to families who cant have children. My surrogate has a beautiful family of her own, a wonderfully supportive husband, and kids, and I am incredibly thankful for all the support they have given Wyatt and me. My family is blessed to have this family in our lives I do wish my mom and dad and my brother, Carter, were alive to meet Wyatt, but I like to believe they can see him. I imagine them all together, arms around each other, smiling and laughing, happy to know that their love is alive in me and in Wyatt, and that our family continues.

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Cooper admitted in his text that he never thought that parenting would be a possibility for him. “As a gay boy, I never thought it would be possible to have a child, and I am grateful to everyone who has paved the way, and to the doctors and nurses and everyone involved in the birth of my son,” he wrote. “Above all, I am grateful to the substitute who brought Wyatt inside and cared for him with love and tenderness, and gave birth to him.” She added: “It is an extraordinary blessing: what she and all the substitutes give to families that cannot have children,” she said. “My surrogate mother has a beautiful family of her own, a wonderfully supportive husband and children, and I am incredibly grateful for all the support they have provided to Wyatt and me. My family is blessed to have this family in our lives. “

The correspondent, CNN journalist and public figure He was already considered one of the most powerful gays in the entertainment industry even before he came out of the closet. In fact, this popular face of American television He acknowledged his homosexuality eight years ago and did so in an email that he accepted one of his friends to disclose. “I am gay I always have been, I always will be and I can’t be happier, more comfortable and proud of it ”, he said then. Now Cooper publicly urges others to follow suit: “I know it’s a personal decision that everyone has to make based on their own reasons but obviously we would all be better off with more visibility.”

The journalist is the son of Gloria Vanderbilt, the youngest of those she had with her fourth husband, the writer Wyatt Emory Cooper. The oldest, Carter, committed suicide in 1988. The designer explained in one of her memoirs, A Mother’s Story, how she witnessed the moment when her son, who was suffering from depression, jumped from the balcony of his apartment in New York. “There was a moment,” he told Anderson himself in an interview in 2012, “when it seemed like he wasn’t going to jump. He was sitting on the balcony, on the 13th floor, with one foot inside and the other dangling. I begged him not to, and when he did, he did it like an athlete. He hung up and I told him to come back. For a moment I thought I would. “

The designer and writer was the granddaughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt, the millionaire who took it upon himself to spread the railroad across the United States. Cornelius’s son and Gloria’s father died alcoholized when she was just a baby and was left in charge of his mother, who frequented high society with his twin sister, lover of the Prince of Wales. When she turned 10, her paternal aunt, the founder of the Whitney Museum in New York, asked for her custody in court, fearful of what her ex-sister-in-law was doing with the little girl’s fortune. The case was followed by the press and the sentence only allowed the girl to see her mother during summers.

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